The Real Question We Should Be Asking About the Migrant Caravan

Migrant Caravan: When Wanting a Better Life is a Crime from genevalopez2012.com

My stomach was recently turned when watching a news station’s report on The Migrant Caravan(s). I couldn’t believe some of the things “professionals” were stating about these groups of human beings making their way here, flippantly throwing around words like “invaders,” “diseases,” and “terrorists.” It was disheartening and even more disturbing to me that their large audience was taking it all in and blindly agreeing with their discourse.

I am not here today to try to change your mind about who you vote for. I am not here today to try and even change your mind about how our country should handle immigration reform. Today, I’m here simply asking us to treat human beings like human beings, in both our actions and our words.

So many individuals, including our government entities, have placed a major focus on the theory that someone is paying the caravans to do this. It might surprise you to know, that I don’t dismiss that theory. Heck, not even my husband, a native of El Salvador, rejects that theory. We both think it’s quite possible that some of these individuals are being paid, though we believe it could be either political party behind it. But, Friends, why are we not asking the more important questions?

For argument’s sake, let’s propose that some of the members in these groups of individuals are, in fact, being paid to make this journey. Even if that’s happening, they’re not being paid much. Maybe-maybe-a few hundred bucks. Maybe. But let’s look at the bigger picture, here.

These individuals are traveling mostly by foot from Honduras and El Salvador. From El Salvador to Texas, there are approximately 1,400 miles. Let me repeat that: 1,400 miles distance between the Texas border and El Salvador and these groups are traveling it by foot. Additionally, many of these migrants are making this journey with infants and children in tow, sleeping on the streets and walking the harsh terrains. It will take them more than 1 month to make this trek by foot.

The most important question here isn’t whether or not these groups are being paid to do this. The most important question here is that even if they are, why are they doing it? What would possess a woman to journey on foot, 1,400+ miles with her 6-month old baby, to a land where she knows political tension is high, where she knows she is not wanted by a great many, where she knows that she will most likely be detained by authorizing agencies that have many claims against them of violations of human rights? What would make anyone willing to do that, even for a few hundred dollars?

The answer? Desperation.

Even if you believe these recent caravans in the news are fake and made up of paid actors, the truth is, they represent reality. Because even if these aren’t “real” people (and I believe the majority are, in fact, “real”), there are thousands before them and after them who are real and who are making dangerous journeys here. We can try to pass it off as fake news, we can shut our eyes to it, and we can bury our heads in the sand, but it will not change the fact that these caravans represent the very real reality.

Even if “real” people aren’t traveling the whole way by foot, their journey is still incredibly dangerous. Women and children who try to make the trip are often raped and violated on the way. Many migrants die on the journeys through the harsh climate of the desert. Parents will take out loans to pay “coyotes” to transport their minor children to the USA. Why? Why would anyone be willing to take such risks with their own lives or the lives of their children?

Desperation.

Let’s look at a few facts. I focus on El Salvador in this post because I am the most personally involved with it and have the most knowledge about its problems compared to the other countries involved. However, the other Central American countries affected have very similar statistics.

  • According to the World Bank, 1 in 3 Salvadoran inhabitants lives in poverty, which means they make less than $5.50 per day.
  • The World Health Organization classifies homicide rates at epidemic proportions once it reaches a ratio of 10 for every 100,000 inhabitants. In 2017, the average homicide rate in El Salvador was 60 per 100,000 inhabitants, one of the highest in the entire world.
  • In 2017, the homicide rate of children and adolescents in El Salvador was 16 per 100,000 inhabitants. Maybe that doesn’t sound like a lot to you, so let me try to make it a little more real to you: That would wipe out my 6-year old son’s entire 1st grade class.
  • Businesses are being extorted by gangs, forced to pay money to the area gangsters in order to keep their business; in order to stay alive, even.
  • Children and youth are being forced to join the violent gangs and if they refuse, the lives of their family members are threatened and the innocence of their sisters taken as retaliation.

This is the reality that these individuals are living in every day, so even with all the risks that come with an “illegal” journey to the US border, it all seems worth it. For many, it’s no worse than the risks they face every single day in their home countries.

THIS is what we should be focused on when we look at the caravans. Maybe these particular caravans are a ruse, but ruse or not, they represent the very real reality of thousands of other migrants. We don’t have to agree with their methods. I’m not even suggesting that we should allow all of these individuals into the United States. But can we please stop treating them like dirt and referring to them as animals? Can we treat them with the dignity they deserve as human beings? Can we stop spreading rumors and fear among our citizens? Can we get out and meet our neighbors? Can we stop relying on the media, our President, and our government for all the facts about these people and can we step out of our comfort zone and start having open conversations with people who are different from us? Can we think about what we would do if we were faced with the situation many of these migrants find themselves in? Can you really sit there and try to tell me you would do anything different if you were in their shoes?

While not all who make the journey have good intentions, the majority are simply desperate for a better life. Let’s thank God that most of us in the United States can’t even fathom this level of desperation and let’s treat these people with decency. Let’s look past our political parties, our political beliefs, and for goodness sakes, let’s show some integrity and stand up for the humane treatment of a group of individuals who are literally willing to put their lives at risk to come here. Let’s refuse to justify everything that is said by someone simply because they’re on the same “team” as us. Let’s agree to disagree on political reform, but let’s all agree to treat human beings with decency and respect, both in our actions and the words we use to describe them.

They are not invaders. They are simply human beings desperate for life.

Migrant Caravan: When Wanting a Better Life is a Crime from genevalopez2012@gmail.com

Published by

Geneva

Geneva is some weird combination of a failed Southern Belle and a white girl with a Latino heart. She's married to her stud muffin husband from El Salvador and is the mom of (almost) 3 awesome kiddos. She's quirky, sometimes (often times) socially awkward, and full of corny humor. She loves to write about Jesus and her Faith, being a mom, and bridging the gap between Christianity and mental health. Her blog posts are sometimes serious, sometimes aspire to inspire, and sometimes just a public display of laughing at herself.

One thought on “The Real Question We Should Be Asking About the Migrant Caravan”

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s